Stop Having Sex for the First Time – part 2

In the first part of this article, I gave some various examples of how InfoSec teams are structured to fail or at the very least function very inefficiently. Next we’ll talk about how to achieve a more effective *INTEL* team – and how it will enable the development of intelligence in the organization.

FIRST: Specialization Without Division –
So, here’s where experience in the bedroom really pans out in this InfoSecsy relationship. You want to get lots of smart people who each excel at one thing but know a little bit about a lot of related things.

Both InfoSec & Intel teams will benefit from this structure, the caveat is that you must also have people with the right personality (nobody likes selfishness in the sheets). In addition to the right mix of talent, you need people that respect each other’s abilities, aren’t afraid to ask for help and will be willing and even eager to share what they find. You don’t need a bunch of multipurpose rock stars, rather you want people who excel at things such as malware reverse engineering, pcap analysis, social engineering, development, data analysis, and even specific application software etc. You also want them to have foundation knowledge in other security realms.

The second part to this is that they are ONE TEAM, they are not divided into divisions with Directors and VPs over specific areas rather they are outside hires or even the internal elite from the network security team, the security operations center, the devops team etc. They will likely have liasion relationships with these functional areas and access to the data from them as well.

In some cases it may make sense to have multiple teams located together across the country, in some cases the company size may support having them co-locate in one physical space, nonetheless the bottom line is that they are all ONE Team. They are your version of a special forces troop, everyone has a job yet they all help each other and are willing to learn what they can about another area to be as effective and helpful as possible when needed.
SECOND: In Failure and Success, in Sickness and in Health ’til Termination Do We Part

This is an InfoSecsy partnership whether you like it or not. If an attack on your organization succeeds or fails, you share the responsibility. If you build something, and it doesn’t work, you share the failure and when it does, you share the success. If you have an idea and it leads nowhere, you mark it off as something tried and eliminated. If you have an idea, try it, if it fails tell everyone WHY/HOW it failed so they don’t waste resources trying the same thing, then move on. If you try something and it succeeds, share so everyone knows WHY/HOW it worked and they can repeat, enhance, and also succeed. [Ask @Ben0xA for his preso on FIAL – it’s awesome]
THIRD: share, Share, SHare, SHAre, SHARe, SHARE, SHARE!!!!!

Sharing InfoSecsy knowledge, skills, experience and ideas is only going to enhance your Intel team and company’s security posture. For example, the other day I had someone tell me that an Exchange team was unable to help us identify who clicked on a link while accessing OWA on a machine because everyone shared a generic login on the shared workstation. Having similar experience in a related area, I was able to offer a suggestion to the Exchange Team and the SOC Analyst that allowed the proper syslogs to be identified in their repository and the Exchange Team to liason with the Windows IIS team to pull the data that was later analyzed. Neither of these areas was my responsibility or expertise, but due to their willingness to share the problem and brainstorm, solutions emerged.
Another example, When we had a host that was unable to be found, I got the NOC, SOC and Help Desk all talking and we collectively came up with a non-traditional way to protect the network and find the asset. While I didn’t know the topology I was able to ask questions that spawned conversations that resulted in solutions.

Sometimes the person with the LEAST knowledge in a subject area can ask the simplest question that will light a much needed fire when because of how they processed the information. The bottom line is – get your people together regularly to discuss what has/is happened, known, and is yet to be figured out, and collectively, ideas and solutions will emerge.
FINALLY: Recycle & Re-Use

For this final note, I’ll use a hypothetical incident as an example. A Sales Engineer (SE) gets an email from an individual purportedly representing one if his clients. The individual is asking for assistance in collecting network and netflow data to help him tune his SIEM, a seemingly harmless request. As the conversation progresses the SE thinks the guy is sketchy so he contacts the SOC. The SOC runs a number of checks on the accounts and checks for any relationship to any known incidents, nothing is found. Guidance given is to limit the scope of information given to the individual per the company guidelines. So what’s next? Well, if we abide by the 3rd rule, this information would get shared with the Intel team, and then the 4th rule takes effect, the information is recycled. It is sent through the Intel Team that runs through it with a different filter and they begin to identify that not only is the individual sketchy, he is possibly even an imposter executing a very crafty social engineering attack. So what’s next? Recycle & Re-Use again. Contact the customer that the individual claims to represent and pass the information to them. Let them look at it with a different filter. You never know what puzzle someone else is putting together and what appears to be “nothing to see here” might be a critical piece of information that ties everything together for someone else.

SUMMARY:
The first part of this article discussed how traditional, rigid, corporate sandboxes of responsibility that define various IT functionalities within an InfoSec program have a tendency to do hinder effectiveness when it comes to security. The second part of this article provides some ideas and examples on how to restructure and build teams as well as ideas on when/how share information across specialities. There are a few takeaways I’d like to leave you with:

1. The only right structure, is the one that maximizes and encourages information sharing and meets the organizational needs for security AND intelligence within resource constraints

2. Embrace failures – they are the stepping stones that lead to the door of success

3. Bring your teams (worker bee level) from all disciplines, together regularly to discuss all kinds of security concerns and issues everyone is experiencing – and most of all encourage them to SHARE ideas and experience.

4. Recycle data on security incidents, even concerns of a possible incident. Ensure they are passed amongst your teams via a process that works for your organization, with the end goal of everyone getting a say-so/review of it.

So go forth, do great things, and enjoy the InfoSecsy side of security not just the InfoFail side.

Thank you once again for taking time to read OSINT Heaven’s Blog.